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Title
Category
Credits
Event date
Cost
  • Primary Care
  • FREE for Members
  • Contact hours
$10.00
0.75 NAPNAP Contact Hour. This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is 10$. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is the most common hip pathology in children aged 8−15 years old. Research has shown that when a nonorthopedic provider evaluates this patient population, there can be a significant delay in the appropriate treatment, which may have serious consequences for the prognosis of the patient. The delays are often caused by the practitioner’s inability to put the clinical picture into focus with regard to how these patients typically present.. This article presents the demographics, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, radiological and physical examination techniques, and prevention strategies to recognize this condition and provide early intervention. J Pediatr Health Care. (2020) 35, 239−247.
  • Primary Care
  • FREE for Members
  • Contact hours
$10.00
1.0 NAPNAP Contact Hour. This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is 10$. We live in a technology-saturated world, evidenced by widespread, global use of the Internet and other forms of technology. Technology offers nearly limitless connectivity, information-sharing, and communication. Unfortunately, with these opportunities come risks, especially for children, and pediatric healthcare providers have a responsibility to be aware and informed of these risks and how to respond. This article provides a breakdown of the broad phenomenon of electronic aggression and offers practice implications for healthcare providers. J PediatrHealth Care.(2020) Volume 35, Issue 1, p132−140.
  • Primary Care
  • FREE for Members
  • Pharmacology CE
  • Psychopharmacology CE
  • Controlled Substances CE
  • Contact hours
$10.00
0.5 contact hour of which 0.5 contain pharmacology content and 0.5 controlled substances.This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Urine drug screening (UDS) is a laboratory test frequently used to screen for drugs of abuse, monitor for medication compliance, evaluate for suspected drug intoxication or overdose, and in office-based pain contracts (Kale, 2019; Standridge, Adams, & Zotos, 2010). In children and adolescents,UDS may be used to prevent substance use, evaluate for suspected drug use or intoxication, or as part of substance abuse treatment (Levy & Siqueira, 2014). When using UDS as a tool to make clinical decisions about high-risk medications, it is important to understand the differences between UDS testing modalities, common causes of falsepositive or false-negative results, and the detection window of specific medications. There are two commonly used types of UDS available: immunoassay and gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC-MS; Kale, 2019).
  • Mental Health
  • FREE for Members
  • Contact hours
$10.00
0.75 NAPNAP contact hour. This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP members. For non-members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Medical child abuse (MCA) is a rare but potentially deadly variant of child maltreatment. MCA results in unnecessary health care for a child because of a caregiver’s exaggeration, fabrication, or induction of physical and/or psychological symptoms of illness. These unnecessary health care interventions result in a morbidity rate of 100% in the form of complications and disabilities and a mortality rate as high as 9%. Although MCA is relatively rare, it is estimated that pediatric health care professionals, including pediatric nurse practitioners, will most likely encounter at least one MCA victim in the course of their career. This continuing education article will discuss MCA in terms of definition and features, epidemiology, perpetrators, variants in presentation, consequences, and implications for practice. J Pediatr Health Care. (2021) 35, 644−650
  • Primary Care
  • FREE for Members
  • Pharmacology CE
  • Contact hours
$10.00
1.0 NAPNAP Contact Hour of which 0.25 contain Pharmacology content. This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Psoriasis, which affects up to 2% of children may be associated with significant comorbidity, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, and reduced quality of life. Screening and decision-making require a multidisciplinary approach with the management of potential comorbidities championed by primary care providers and supported by respective specialists and subspecialists. Research into the comorbidities and systemic manifestations has generated significant data culminating in several proposals for a consensus guideline for both pediatric and nonpediatric populations. Our aim is to provide a summary targeted to the pediatric primary care provider from the best available evidence when caring for children with psoriasis. J Pediatr Health Care. (2021) 35, 337−350
  • Primary Care
  • FREE for Members
  • Contact hours
$10.00
1.0 NAPNAP contact hour of which 0.25 contain pharmacology content. This continuing education actvity is offered free to NAPNAP members. For non-members, this continuing education activity rate is $10.00. Pediatric hair loss is a cause of concern for patients and families. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial, as delays in care for certain diagnoses can cause permanent scarring alopecia. The evaluation of hair loss includes a thorough history, physical examination, and other potential tests. The causes of hair loss can be classified as either acquired versus congenital. Acquired causes of hair loss can be subdivided into scarring and nonscarring; however, some conditions may present as nonscarring and progress to scarring alopecia. Recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of pediatric hair loss for the primary care practitioner will be summarized. J Pediatr Health Care. (2021) 35, 651−661
  • FREE for Members
  • Pharmacology CE
  • Contact hours
$10.00
0.75 NAPNAP Contact Hour of which contains 0.75 pharmacology content.. This continuing education activity is offered free to National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body, and the fourth most abundant cation. Sixty percent of total body magnesium is stored in bone, 20% is located in skeletal muscle and the remaining 20% is distributed in various organ tissues, including the kidney, liver, and heart (Grober, Schmidt, & Kisters, 2015). Approximately 0.3% of magnesium is found in the serum (Grober et al., 2015). Therefore, determination of the serum magnesium concentration remains the best readily available test for magnesium deficiency, although it provides only an estimate of total body magnesium stores.This review article provides an overview of key disease states in pediatric patients where magnesium is part of the treatment. The treatment of hypomagnesemia and hypermagnesemia will be described, with review of dosing and timing of magnesium administration. J Pediatr Health Care. (2021) 35, 564-571.