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Title
Category
Credits
Event date
Cost
  • Primary Care
  • FREE for Members
  • Pharmacology CE
  • Psychopharmacology CE
  • Controlled Substances CE
  • Contact hours
$10.00
0.5 contact hour of which 0.5 contain pharmacology content and 0.5 controlled substances.This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Urine drug screening (UDS) is a laboratory test frequently used to screen for drugs of abuse, monitor for medication compliance, evaluate for suspected drug intoxication or overdose, and in office-based pain contracts (Kale, 2019; Standridge, Adams, & Zotos, 2010). In children and adolescents,UDS may be used to prevent substance use, evaluate for suspected drug use or intoxication, or as part of substance abuse treatment (Levy & Siqueira, 2014). When using UDS as a tool to make clinical decisions about high-risk medications, it is important to understand the differences between UDS testing modalities, common causes of falsepositive or false-negative results, and the detection window of specific medications. There are two commonly used types of UDS available: immunoassay and gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC-MS; Kale, 2019).
  • Mental Health
  • FREE for Members
  • Contact hours
$10.00
0.75 NAPNAP contact hour. This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP members. For non-members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Medical child abuse (MCA) is a rare but potentially deadly variant of child maltreatment. MCA results in unnecessary health care for a child because of a caregiver’s exaggeration, fabrication, or induction of physical and/or psychological symptoms of illness. These unnecessary health care interventions result in a morbidity rate of 100% in the form of complications and disabilities and a mortality rate as high as 9%. Although MCA is relatively rare, it is estimated that pediatric health care professionals, including pediatric nurse practitioners, will most likely encounter at least one MCA victim in the course of their career. This continuing education article will discuss MCA in terms of definition and features, epidemiology, perpetrators, variants in presentation, consequences, and implications for practice. J Pediatr Health Care. (2021) 35, 644−650
  • Primary Care
  • FREE for Members
  • Contact hours
$10.00
1.0 NAPNAP contact hour of which 0.25 contain pharmacology content. This continuing education actvity is offered free to NAPNAP members. For non-members, this continuing education activity rate is $10.00. Pediatric hair loss is a cause of concern for patients and families. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial, as delays in care for certain diagnoses can cause permanent scarring alopecia. The evaluation of hair loss includes a thorough history, physical examination, and other potential tests. The causes of hair loss can be classified as either acquired versus congenital. Acquired causes of hair loss can be subdivided into scarring and nonscarring; however, some conditions may present as nonscarring and progress to scarring alopecia. Recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of pediatric hair loss for the primary care practitioner will be summarized. J Pediatr Health Care. (2021) 35, 651−661
  • FREE for Members
  • Pharmacology CE
  • Contact hours
$10.00
0.75 NAPNAP Contact Hour of which contains 0.75 pharmacology content.. This continuing education activity is offered free to National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body, and the fourth most abundant cation. Sixty percent of total body magnesium is stored in bone, 20% is located in skeletal muscle and the remaining 20% is distributed in various organ tissues, including the kidney, liver, and heart (Grober, Schmidt, & Kisters, 2015). Approximately 0.3% of magnesium is found in the serum (Grober et al., 2015). Therefore, determination of the serum magnesium concentration remains the best readily available test for magnesium deficiency, although it provides only an estimate of total body magnesium stores.This review article provides an overview of key disease states in pediatric patients where magnesium is part of the treatment. The treatment of hypomagnesemia and hypermagnesemia will be described, with review of dosing and timing of magnesium administration. J Pediatr Health Care. (2021) 35, 564-571.
  • FREE for Members
  • Contact hours
$10.00
JPHC CE: 0.75 contact hours. This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Child maltreatment is a pediatric health care problem of epidemic proportions. Pediatric health care providers, especially pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs), are uniquely positioned not only to identify potential victims of child maltreatment but also to prevent child maltreatment before its’ occurrence. This continuing education article will discuss practice level child maltreatment prevention interventions, both universal and targeted.
  • FREE for Members
  • Pharmacology CE
  • Contact hours
$10.00
1.0 contact hour of which 1.25 contain pharmacology content. This continuing education activity is offered free to NAPNAP Members. For non- members, this continuing education activity rate is $10. Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is a major public health concern for pediatric and adult patients. The management of pediatric CDI poses a challenge to healthcare providers due to lack of strong randomized controlled trials to guide pharmacological management. Additionally, recent updates to CDI guidelines recommend oral vancomycin over metronidazole for the management of CDI in adults, leaving questions regarding how to best manage pediatric patients. This continuing education pharmacotherapy review describes available evidence for the safety and efficacy of medications used in the treatment and management of pediatric CDI and aims to clarify discrepancies between pediatric and adult recommendations.